Health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at the neonatal intensive care unit, Cairo University Hospital

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Abstract

Background:

Health care–associated infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This study identified health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at a NICU.

Methods:

A qualitative approach was adopted. Participants were selected via a purposive sampling technique. The study group was composed of 3 medical staff who held leadership positions and 10 nurses working in the NICU at Cairo University Hospital. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews.

Results:

Responses were analyzed using a thematic content analysis. The priorities identified by thematic analysis were suggestions and barriers for providing quality infection control measures, from the perspectives of health care providers. All interviewees cited shortage in staffing, especially nurses, lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload as the main barriers. All interviewees recommended on-going training and the introduction of audiovisual aids and case study approaches.

Conclusions:

Lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload are the most commonly perceived barriers. The current infection control system in the NICU is likely to remain ineffective unless these underlying barriers are adequately addressed.

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