Correlation between ambulatory blood pressure variability and vasodilator function in middle-aged normotensive individuals

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ambulatory blood pressure variability and vasodilator function in a cohort of normotensive middle-aged individuals.

Participants and methods

This was a cross-sectional study of 285 randomly selected 40–59-year-old normotensive participants who underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and brachial artery ultrasound assessment. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability (BPV) of 24-h, daytime, and night-time were calculated using the coefficients of variation (CV) and the average real variability (ARV) index. Brachial arterial endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDD) was assessed in response to increased flow and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EID) was assessed in response to nitroglycerin. Relationships were explored using univariate and multivariate linear regression.

Results

The EDD were negatively associated with the CV of 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP), the ARV of 24-h SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in univariate analysis. However, the CV and ARV of 24-h SBP remained associated independently with % EDD in multivariate analysis. In addition, the mean levels of 24-h SBP and DBP, the CV of 24-h SBP and DBP, the ARV of 24-h SBP and DBP, the CV of daytime SBP, and the ARV of daytime DBP were all associated with % EID. However, in a multiple linear regression model, adjusting for covariates, only the CV and ARV of 24-h SBP, and the ARV of 24-h DBP were correlated negatively but weakly with % EID.

Conclusion

Our results indicated that a higher 24-h BPV was associated independently with decreased endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilator functions in a middle-aged normotensive population. Although 24-h BPV was associated with vasodilator function, relationships were attenuated after adjusting for covariates.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles