He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Continuum Issue

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Excerpt

Dr Neeraj Kumar has expertly crafted a weighty issue that will be of great benefit to us as we encounter patients with the large variety of disorders that occur in association with, or as a complication of, systemic (medical) disorders or their treatments.
At the risk of using another outdated (and to some, incomprehensible) pop-culture reference, I want to use the preface to this Continuum issue to discuss my editorial vision for Continuum that has had an obvious outcome in the increasing girth of our issues. There has, in fact, been an increase in the number of pages per issue under my tenure as editor-in-chief: from 2009 to 2012, the average number of pages per issue was 252, while from 2013 to 2016, subsequent to my becoming editor, the average number of pages per issue grew to 312, a 24% increase.
This has been purposeful, primarily due to my editorial intention to provide more articles per issue so that each issue is as inclusive as possible of the information we each need as we see our many patients. In addition, it is my intent to ensure that the actual topic-based themes of each issue are as broad as possible (eg, the recent issue Muscle and Neuromuscular Junction Disorders rather than an issue devoted entirely to a single disorder or two within this subject area [eg, myasthenia gravis]) to allow for inclusion of as much information as possible in each 3-year Continuum curriculum cycle. The result of this editorial direction has been thicker individual issues while allowing for more breadth in the entire curriculum. In summary, I feel that by being more encompassing of many topics in the curriculum and including more (albeit sometimes large) individual articles per issue, Continuum becomes more useful as our source of practical office and bedside information regarding the many entities we see daily, even at the risk of diminishing the ease of cover-to-cover reading. On the other hand, while ensuring that the content is as thorough, diverse, and practical as possible, we will continue to seek practical solutions, such as making some content online only (eg, some Coding articles and supplementary content) and removing much of the previous redundancy in the CME pages of each issue.
In this issue, Guest Editor Dr Neeraj Kumar, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, has expertly crafted a weighty issue that will be of great benefit to us as we encounter patients with the large variety of disorders that occur in association with, or as a complication of, systemic (medical) disorders or their treatments. The issue begins with the article by Drs W. Oliver Tobin and Sean J. Pittock, who provide us with the most up-to-date information regarding the diagnosis and management of the evolving spectrum of autoimmune neurologic disorders. Next, Dr James P. Klaas reviews the many neurologic complications that can occur in our patients with cardiac and aortic diseases. Dr Michelle L. Mauermann then summarizes the neurologic complications of lymphomas, leukemias, and paraproteinemias and includes an overview of the diagnostic tests that inform our diagnosis of these disorders. Next, Dr Elliot L. Dimberg discusses the many rheumatologic disorders and their various potential associated neurologic complications and associations.
Dr Sara E. Hocker reviews the overlap between renal disease and disorders of the nervous system, including the conditions that affect both the renal and the nervous systems, the neurologic disorders that occur as a consequence of renal failure, and the neurologic complications of dialysis. Dr Ronald F.
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