Impact of Preeclampsia on Clinical and Functional Outcomes in Women With Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

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Abstract

Background—

Preeclampsia is a risk factor for the development of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), but it is unknown whether preeclampsia impacts clinical or left ventricular (LV) functional outcomes. This study sought to assess clinical and functional outcomes in women with PPCM complicated by preeclampsia.

Methods and Results—

This retrospective cohort study included women diagnosed with PPCM delivering at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2004 to 2014. The primary outcome was one-year event-free survival rate for the combined end point of death and hospital readmission. The secondary outcome was recovery of LV ejection fraction. Seventeen of 39 women (44%) with PPCM had preeclampsia. The groups had similar mean LV ejection fraction at diagnosis (29.6 with versus 27.3 without preeclampsia; P=0.5). Women with preeclampsia had smaller mean LV end-diastolic diameters (5.2 versus 6.0 cm; P=0.001), greater relative wall thickness (0.41 versus 0.35 mm Hg; P=0.009), and lower incidence of eccentric remodeling (12% versus 48%; P=0.03). Clinical follow-up was available for 32 women; 5 died of cardiovascular complications within 1 year of diagnosis (4/15 with versus 1/17 without preeclampsia; P=0.16). In time to event analysis, patients with preeclampsia had worse event-free survival during 1-year follow-up (P=0.047). Echocardiographic follow-up was available in 10 survivors with and 16 without preeclampsia. LV ejection fraction recovered in 80% of survivors with versus 25% without preeclampsia (P=0.014).

Conclusions—

PPCM with concomitant preeclampsia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and different patterns of LV remodeling and recovery of LV function when compared with patients with PPCM that is not complicated by preeclampsia.

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