Effect of low-volume high-intensity interval exercise and continuous exercise on delayed-onset muscle soreness in untrained healthy males

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a single session of a low-volume high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and a continuous exercise (CE) on the magnitude of delayed onset-muscle soreness (DOMS) in untrained healthy males. Fifteen participants (25.1±4.4 years) completed 2 experimental sessions in a randomized order: (a) low-volume HIIE: 10 x 60 s at 90% of maximal velocity (MV) interspersed with 60s of active recovery at 30% of MV; and (b) CE: 20 min at 60% of MV. Pressure-pain threshold (PPT), pressure-pain tolerance (PPTol) and perceived pain intensity (PPI) were assessed in the rectus femoris, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius before and 24 hours post-exercise. There was a decrease of PPT in the rectus femoris (–0.5 kg/cm2) and PPTol in the gastrocnemius (–1.4 kg/cm2) and an increase of PPI in the rectus femoris (14.4 mm) and in the biceps femoris (11.7 mm) 24 hours following the low-volume HIIE session (P<0.05). There was a decrease of PPT (rectus femoris: -0.8 kg/cm2; biceps femoris: -0.5 kg/cm2; gastrocnemius: -0.9 kg/cm2) and PPTol (rectus femoris: -1.9 kg/cm2; biceps femoris: -2.7 kg/cm2; gastrocnemius: -1.6 kg/cm2) and an increase of PPI (rectus femoris: 8.1 mm; biceps femoris: 10.3 mm; gastrocnemius: 17.5 mm) in all muscles 24 hours following the CE session (P<0.05). No difference was observed between HIIE and CE sessions in any DOMS parameter (P>0.05). In conclusion, a single session of low-volume HIIE and CE elicited a similar mild DOMS 24 hours post-exercise in untrained healthy males.

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