Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Outcome of Infantile Ocular Trauma: A Developing Country Perspective

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this article was to study the clinical profile, etiology, and outcome of infantile ocular trauma in a developing country setting.

Methods

A retrospective study on corneal trauma in infants (≤12 months old) was undertaken in a tertiary care hospital during a 2-year period. An analysis of clinical profile, etiology, microbiological profile, clinical course, and outcome was studied.

Results

Seventy-six infants were included. Approximately 69% presented within 24 hours of injury. The common presentations were inability to open the eyelids, redness of eyes, and watering. Self-infliction by child's hand (49%) was found to be the main cause of corneal trauma. Corneal abrasion was seen in 34 cases (45%), isolated epithelial defects were seen in 30%, and infective keratitis was seen in 25%. Infection was found in 14 cases (fungal filaments in 7 and gram-positive cocci in 7). Only 36 infants followed up regularly in the hospital. All the infants following up in the hospital recovered in due course.

Conclusions

Infantile ocular trauma is a common morbidity that is underreported. Self-infliction by child's hand was found to be the main cause of corneal trauma. Cases presenting early and following up regularly till recovery have a favorable clinical course with good outcome. A high loss to follow-up indicates that awareness needs to be created among the caregivers.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles