Calcium sensing receptor initiating cystathionine-gamma-lyase/hydrogen sulfide pathway to inhibit platelet activation in hyperhomocysteinemia rat

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Abstract

Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, high homocysteine) induces the injury of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects ECs and inhibits the activation of platelets. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates the production of endogenous H2S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the injury of ECs and the activation of platelets by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S)/H2S pathway in hyperhomocysteinemia has not been previously investigated. Here, we tested the ultrastructure alterations of ECs and platelets, the changes in the concentration of serum homocysteine and the parameters of blood of hyperhomocysteinemia rats were measured. The aggregation rate and expression of P-selectin of platelets were assessed. Additionally, the expression levels of CaSR and CSE in the aorta of rats were examined by western blotting. The mitochondrial membrane potential and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured; the expression of phospho-calmodulin kinases II (p-CaMK II) and Von Willebrand Factor (vWF) of cultured ECs from rat thoracic aortas were measured. We found that the aggregation rate and the expression of P-selectin of platelets increased, and the expression of CaSR and CSE decreased in HHcy rats. In the ECs of HHcy group, the ROS production increased and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased markedly, the expression of CSE and the p-CaMK II increased after treatment with CaSR agonist while decreased upon administration of U73122 (PLC-specific inhibitor) and 2-APB (IP3 Receptor inhibitor). CaSR agonist or NaHS significantly reversed the ECs injured and platelet aggregation caused by hyperhomocysteinemia. Our results demonstrate that CaSR regulates the endogenous CSE/H2S pathway to inhibit the activation of platelets which concerts the protection of ECs in hyperhomocysteinemia.

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