Health-Related Quality of Life Among US Workers: Variability Across Occupation Groups

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Abstract

Objectives

To examine the health-related quality of life among workers in 22 standard occupation groups using data from the 2013-2014 US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Methods

We examined the health-related quality of life measures of self-rated health, frequent physical distress, frequent mental distress, frequent activity limitation, and frequent overall unhealthy days by occupation group for 155 839 currently employed adults among 17 states. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses that accounted for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System’s complex survey design to obtain prevalence estimates adjusted for potential confounders.

Results

Among all occupation groups, the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupation group reported the highest adjusted prevalence of frequent physical distress, frequent mental distress, frequent activity limitation, and frequent overall unhealthy days. The personal care and service occupation group had the highest adjusted prevalence for fair or poor self-rated health.

Conclusions

Workers’ jobs affect their health-related quality of life.

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