The relationship between maternal and umbilical cord adropin levels with the presence and severity of preeclampsia

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Abstract

Aim:

To investigate both maternal and umbilical cord adropin levels in patients with preeclampsia and the possible relations with its severity and perinatal outcomes.

Materials and methods:

In this study, a total of 38 preeclamptic and 40 age-matched healthy pregnant women between January and June 2016 were included. Serum and cord adropin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

Results:

The maternal and umbilical cord adropin levels were significantly lower in the preeclamptic group compared to controls [71.19±22.21 vs. 100.76±27.02 ng/L and 92.39 (59.77:129.89) vs. 106.20 (74.42:208.02) ng/L, P<0.001, respectively]. While maternal adropin levels were significantly lower in the severe preeclampsia group as compared to the mild preeclamptic group [66.45 (21.49:98.02) vs. 76.17 (58.06:109.58), P=0.007], umbilical cord adropin levels did not differ between each group [91.32 (59.77:113.34) vs. 92.87 (63.12:129.89), P=0.750]. Maternal adropin level was negatively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures (r=−0.60, P<0.001 and r=−0.58, P<0.001, respectively) and positively correlated with platelet count (r=0.27, P=0.016). Moreover, umbilical cord adropin levels were weakly correlated with gestational age at delivery (r=0.28, P=0.012) and birth weight (r=0.28, P=0.014).

Conclusion:

The present study is the first to demonstrate a significant association between maternal and umbilical adropin levels and the presence and severity of preeclampsia. Adropin might be a useful parameter for predicting the presence and severity of preeclampsia.

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