Prevalence and Characteristics of Nonblanching, Palpable Skin Lesions With a Linear Pattern in Children With Henoch-Schönlein Syndrome

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Abstract

Importance

Linear nonblanching skin lesions are thought to occur very rarely in patients with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome.

Objective

To examine the prevalence and characteristics of linear nonblanching skin lesions in children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome.

Design, Setting, and Participants

A prospective case series was conducted at the ambulatory practice of a hospitalist between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015, among 31 consecutive children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome.

Participants

Thirty-one consecutive children affected with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome who were from 3.0 to 12.0 years of age (median age, 6.2 years).

Main Outcome and Measures

Children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome underwent a careful, structured skin examination established in advance with emphasis on the presence of palpable lesions with a linear pattern.

Results

Among the 31 children in the study (12 girls and 19 boys; median age, 6.2 years [range, 3.0-12.0 years]), 8 (26%) had linear lesions on the legs, groin, waistline, wrists, or forearms. Patients with or without linear lesions did not differ significantly with respect to sex, age, and cutaneous, abdominal, articular, or renal involvement.

Conclusions and Relevance

This study illustrates the prevalence and characteristics of linear skin lesions in patients with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. Patients with symptoms suggestive of this vasculitis should be evaluated for the presence of nonblanching, palpable lesions with a linear pattern.

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