Relationship between the use of intuition in clinical practice and the clinical competence of critical care nurses

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Abstract

Introduction:

Clinical competency has been the main focus of nurse educational systems. To further it, the concept of intuition was introduced into nursing in the 1970s. Benner's theory proposed that greater use of intuition was linked to higher clinical competence; however, there is still a paucity of data to verify this theory. Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess the relationship between the use of intuition in clinical practice and the clinical competence of critical care nurses.

Methods:

In this correlational study, 88 critical care nurses were recruited as convenience. The tools included a ‘use of intuition in clinical practice’ scale devised by the researcher, and a ‘clinical competence’ instrument. The gathered data were analyzed by SPSS version 20.0 software, using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Results:

Of the 88 participants, 73.9% were women and 93.2% were at undergraduate level. The mean and standard deviation of participants’ age and work experience was 32.29 ± 6.75 and 7.40 ± 5.68 years, respectively. The Pearson correlation test revealed no significant connection between the use of intuition in clinical practice and the clinical competence of critical care nurses (r = 0.091, P = 0.398), and produced similar results from the various demographic groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion:

In this study, no significant correlation between the use of intuition and clinical competence in critical care nurses was found. This could be attributed to intuition as a nursing skill being almost excluded from the educational curriculum of nursing schools, and some background factors.

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