Glasgow prognostic score predicts therapeutic outcome after hepatic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma.

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Abstract

Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), predicts cancer-specific survival in various cancer types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the GPS in the therapeutic outcome of the patient following surgical resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. In total, 144 patients underwent surgical resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. For the assessment of systemic inflammatory response using the GPS, patients were classified into three groups: Patients with normal serum albumin (<3.5 g/dl) and normal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (≤1.0 mg/dl) were classified as GPS 0 (n=76), those with low serum albumin (<3.5 g/dl) or elevated serum CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) were classified as GPS 1 (n=58), and those with low serum albumin (<3.5 g/dl) and elevated serum CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) were classified as GPS 2 (n=10). Retrospectively, the relationship between patient characteristics including GPS, disease-free as well as overall survival were investigated. In disease-free survival, GPS 2 (P=0.019), with a tumor number ≥3 (P=0.004), and positive portal or venous invasion (P=0.034) were independent predictors of cancer recurrence in multivariate analysis. In overall survival, GPS 1 (P=0.042), GPS 2 (P<0.001) and positive portal or venous invasion (P<0.001) were independent predictors of poor patient outcome according to multivariate analysis. To conclude, the GPS in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is an independent prognostic predictor after hepatic resection.

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