Peripheral Venous Pressure Measurements in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (PVP-HF)

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Abstract

Background

Accurate assessment of volume status is essential in diagnosis and guidance of decongestive therapy in patients with acute heart failure. We sought to compare peripheral venous pressure (PVP) with central venous pressure (CVP), as well as other invasive hemodynamic measurements, in patients hospitalized with an acute heart failure syndrome.

Methods and Results

PVP-HF (Peripheral Venous Pressure Measurements in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure) was a single-center prospective study, which enrolled patients admitted with acute heart failure, regardless of ejection fraction or disease pathogenesis. PVP and intracardiac pressures were obtained by transducing a peripheral intravenous and pulmonary artery catheter, respectively, after zeroing at the phlebostatic axis. Data were compared using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman plots. A total of 30 patients (median age 64 years, 73% male, 30% ischemic pathogenesis) were enrolled. Mean ejection fraction was 31%, and 60% had moderate or greater right ventricular dysfunction. Median PVP was 9.5 (6–17) mm Hg, CVP was 8.5 (6–18) mm Hg, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 18 (14–21) mm Hg. PVP and CVP were found to be highly correlated (r=0.947), while PVP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure were found to be moderately correlated (r=0.565). The mean difference between PVP and CVP was 0.4 mm Hg and between PVP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 7.5 mm Hg.

Conclusions

In patients with acute heart failure syndromes, a simple assessment of PVP demonstrates a high correlation with CVP. These findings suggest that PVP may be useful in the standard bedside clinical assessment of volume status in these patients to help guide decongestive therapy.

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