Patients' Opinions of OR Nurses and Environments in the Postoperative Period

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Abstract

Purpose:

To determine patients' opinions of operating room (OR) nurses and environments in the postoperative period.

Design:

A descriptive study.

Methods:

The data were collected by using researcher developed forms that defined patients' opinions of OR nurses and environments and were given to the patients on the first postoperative day.

Finding:

The final sample consisted of a total of 208 patients who underwent surgery with regional anesthesia. Percentage measurements were used in the assessment of data. The majority (69.3%) of nurses did not introduce themselves to their patients and 61.3% failed to introduce the OR environments to their patients. Patients explored their (ORs) in the range of 62% and 90% and considered these locations to be calm and reliable environments where their needs were met and their communications with the staff were positive. The rate of patients who felt that their ORs were not cold was 35.3%.

Conclusions:

In this study, most patients were not aware that OR nursing played an important role in a postive patient perception of the OR. Most OR nurses did not introduce themselves to patients while providing nursing care, and patients were not aware of who provided this service to them.

Conclusions:

In light of these findings, it is recommended that nurses introduce themselves to patients in the OR when beginning care of the patient. Moreover, special effort should be made regarding maintenance of normal body temperature of patients in the OR.

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