Smoking Cessation Advisory Intervention in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Several studies have examined the efficacy of smoking cessation therapies in the general population. However little is known about the efficacy of these advisory methods in cardiovascular patients.

AIM

The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence and the characteristics of smoking abstinence in cardiovascular patients, after a smoking intervention during hospitalization.

METHODS

The study involved 442 patients, smokers admitted for cardiovascular disease to the Department of Cardiology. During hospitalization patient's data were collected and all patients were subjected to a 30-minutes long advisory session with drug administration in selected cases (varenicycline, bupropione, nocitine replacement therapy), according to standard protocol. After the discharge patients were asked about smoking abstinence at time intervals of 24 hours, 1 month, 3, 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS

After hospital discharge 11 patients (2.49%) could not be contacted after several attempts and 19 patients (4.3%) were died during follow up period. A total of 412 patients (218 men and 194 women, mean age 56.49+10.57 years) made up the final study population. Twenty four hours after hospital discharge 364 patients (88.35%) had quitted smoking. At 1, 3, 6 and 12 months the abstinence rates were 70.87%, 64.8%, 55.82% and 47.83% respectively. Patients with ischaemic cardiovascular diseases (angina - infarction) had a significantly higher probability of quitting smoking at 12 months (Hazard ratio: 0.64 - p=0.01).

CONCLUSION

A smoking cessation program in cardiovascular patients during hospitalization was unlikely to result in success. These patients might benefit by following programs promoting smoking cessation in experienced specialized centers, involving a group of health professionals, such as psychologists and/or trained nurses.

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