Problem-Solving Therapy for Suicide Prevention in Veterans With Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

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Abstract

Objective: Develop and test the acceptability and feasibility of Problem-Solving Therapy for Suicide Prevention (PST-SP), a group intervention aimed at improving problem solving and preventing suicide, among Veterans with hopelessness and moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Research Method: Following treatment development, 16 U.S. Veterans with moderate-to-severe TBI and a Beck Hopelessness Scale score ≥4 participated in an acceptability and feasibility pilot study of PST-SP at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Participants completed the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire-8 (CSQ-8) and Narrative Evaluation of Intervention Interview (NEII) after participating in PST-SP. Results: PST-SP was developed for Veterans with moderate-to-severe TBI and hopelessness. 75% (n = 12) of participants enrolled in the pilot study attended ≥80% of PST-SP sessions. Participants reported high satisfaction with PST-SP (CSQ-8 M = 27.8 out of 32; SD = 4.78; range 14–32) and described the intervention as valuable, beneficial, and without negative effects (NEII). Conclusions/Implications: Results from measures of acceptability and attendance suggest that PST-SP is an acceptable and feasible intervention for Veterans with hopelessness and moderate-to-severe TBI. Findings support readiness to examine efficacy of the intervention in a Phase II randomized controlled trial.

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