Incidence and survival trends for medulloblastomas in the United States from 2001 to 2013.

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Abstract

Population-based data examining recent epidemiological trends in medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain malignancy, are limited. Therefore, we sought to examine recent population-level trends in medulloblastoma incidence and survival. Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) data were analyzed from 2001 to 2013. Age-adjusted incidence rates (IR) and annual percent changes (APCs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by age, sex, and race. Relative survival rates were calculated by age, sex, and race using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) registries; subsets of CBTRUS data. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine survival differences. Medulloblastoma incidence remained relatively stable from 2001 to 2013, with minor fluctuations from 2001 to 2009 (APC = 2.2, 95% CI 0.8, 3.5) and 2009-2013 (APC = -4.1, 95% CI -7.5, -0.6). Incidence was highest in patients aged 1-4 years at diagnosis, but patients aged 10-14 years showed increased incidence from 2000 to 2013 (APC = 3.2, 95% CI 0.6, 5.8). Males displayed higher IR relative to females (males: 0.16 vs. females: 0.12), except in patients <1 year-old. Compared to Whites, Blacks displayed a non-significant increase in incidence (APC = 1.7, 95% CI -0.4, 4.0) and in mortality risk (hazard ratio for survival = 0.74; p = 0.09). The current study reports no overall change in medulloblastoma incidence from 2001 to 2013. Male and female patients <1 year-old had equal medulloblastoma incidence rates and poor 5-year relative survival compared to other ages. Non-significant trends in the data suggest disparities in medulloblastoma incidence and survival by race. Thus, analysis of tumor-specific trends by demographic variables can uncover clinically informative trends in cancer burden.

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