Prehospital hemostatic resuscitation to achieve zero preventable deaths after traumatic injury

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Abstract

Purpose of review

To describe how hemostatic resuscitation can be used in the prehospital phase of resuscitation to reduce preventable deaths after traumatic injury.

Recent findings

Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of death that is preventable after injury. The National Academy of Sciences, recently, recommended that achievement of zero preventable deaths after traumatic injury should be the goal of a national trauma system. In the United States, there are an estimated 25 000 preventable deaths per year in the prehospital phase of resuscitation because of traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Therefore, to achieve the goal of zero preventable deaths after injury, both shock and hemostatic dysfunction need to be addressed rapidly in the prehospital phase of resuscitation. This review will highlight the epidemiology and outcomes of traumatic hemorrhagic shock, and explore potential solutions such as group O whole blood and platelets stored at 2–6°C. Trauma research receives the lowest funding relative to the burden of morbidity and mortality it creates when compared with all other diseases. Increased resources are required to achieve zero preventable deaths after injury.

Summary

Prehospital hemostatic resuscitation has the potential to significantly reduce preventable death from hemorrhage.

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