Do Children and Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complete Clinical Disease Indices Similar to Physicians?

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Abstract

Objectives:

The degree to which children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) complete clinical disease activity indices in accordance with their physician is indefinite. Therefore, we investigated the agreement between patient- and physician-based clinical indices in children and adolescents with a previous diagnosis of IBD.

Methods:

In this cross-sectional study, IBD patients (8–18 years) were included prospectively. Patients completed a patient-based short Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (shPCDAI) for Crohn disease or the Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index (PUCAI) for ulcerative or indeterminate colitis. Physicians completed the original physician-based shPCDAI or PUCAI. Agreement was calculated with linear weighted kappa.

Results:

In total, 154 pairs of clinical indices were collected: 89 pairs of shPCDAI's (median age at assessment 15.6 years, 61% men) and 55 pairs of PUCAI's (median age at assessment 14.0 years, 44% men). The shPCDAI disease activity category only fairly agreed between patient- and physician-based indices (kappa: 0.40 [95% confidence interval 0.24–0.55], P < 0.001), with perfect agreement in 58% of pairs. In the majority of disagreement (81%), patients scored in a higher shPCDAI disease activity category. The PUCAI disease activity category substantially agreed between patient- and physician-based indices (kappa: 0.64 [95% confidence interval 0.45–0.83], P < 0.001), with perfect agreement in 78% of pairs. In the majority of disagreement (75%), patients scored in a higher PUCAI disease activity category.

Conclusions:

Patient- and physician-based shPCDAI and PUCAI do not always agree, particularly the shPCDAI, and therefore, should not be interpreted equivalently in management and research on children and adolescents with IBD.

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