UTILITY OF INTRAOPERATIVE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN ACUTE ENDOPHTHALMITIS

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Abstract

Purpose:

To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) during vitrectomy for acute endophthalmitis.

Methods:

The intraoperative and postoperative images of an 87-year-old woman with acute endophthalmitis after uncomplicated cataract surgery were analyzed.

Results:

At presentation, the vision of the patient was 20/2000, and the preoperative OCT was unable to obtain clear images because of vitreous opacities. Intraoperative OCT showed that the inner retinal layer was hyperreflective because of diffuse retinal edema. Cystic changes were also present in the retina. A fibrin-like epiretinal membrane that was connected to the hyperreflective inner retinal layer was detected, and the retinal microstructures were well preserved. Intravitreal injections of vancomycin and ceftazidime were given at the end of the surgery. Postoperative examination showed that the epiretinal membrane–like tissue disappeared on the OCT image 1 month after the surgery, and the vision improved to 20/30.

Conclusion:

Intraoperative OCT can be useful to examine the structural alterations of the retina in eyes with vitreous opacities that prevent preoperative OCT examinations. Evaluations of intraoperative OCT images can provide information on what surgical procedures are needed.

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