Associations Between Victimization and Adolescents' Self-Reported Responses to Peer Provocation Are Moderated by Peer-Reported Aggressiveness

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Abstract

Many early adolescents experience peer victimization, but little research has examined how they respond to aggression by peers. Thus, in a large sample of early adolescents (N = 648; M age = 12.96; SD = 0.30; 52.0% female), we examined (1) the associations between peer-reported victimization and self-reported responses to peer provocation, and (2) whether these associations were moderated by peer-reported aggression. In particular, we predicted that the reported use of assertion, a strategy generally viewed as socially skillful, would be associated with less victimization, but only for youth low on peer-reported aggression. Results were consistent with this hypothesis. Moreover, seeking adult intervention was associated with greater victimization for youth high on peer-reported aggression. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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