Ischemic Conditioning as a Hemostatic Intervention in Surgery and Cardiac Procedures: A Systematic Review

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Ischemic conditioning induced by nonlethal cycles of tissue ischemia and reperfusion attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of local and remote ischemic conditioning on laboratory parameters of hemostasis and the clinical outcomes of thromboembolism or bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant human trials published in English between January 1, 1986, and September 7, 2016, and additional studies were identified from reference lists. Data on laboratory parameters of hemostasis, thromboembolism, and bleeding were extracted for qualitative synthesis. In total, 69 studies were included; of these, 53 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 11 were meta-analyses. Local and remote ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activation in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Local ischemic conditioning did not reduce the thromboembolic risk in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. Remote ischemic conditioning reduced the incidence of arterial thromboembolism after surgery or cardiac procedures in 3 out of 28 RCTs and 4 out of 5 meta-analyses. Local and remote ischemic conditioning did not increase operative bleeding. In conclusion, ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activity without increasing the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. Limited evidence supports the proposal that ischemic conditioning reduces the incidence of arterial thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles