Management of asymptomatic neonates born in the setting of chorioamnionitis: a safety comparison of the well-baby and intensive care setting

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evaluate the safety of a change in care setting for asymptomatic neonates born to mothers with chorioamnionitis from the neonatal intensive care unit to the well baby nursery.

LOCAL PROBLEM:

The neonatal intensive care unit evaluation and management of babies born to mothers with chorioamionitis often involves separation of the mother-baby dyad and more invasive interventions.

METHODS:

A single-center pre/post-intervention study of neonates born from January 2011 to November 2016, comparing safety outcomes in the neonatal intensive care unit (pre-intervention) and well baby nursery (post-intervention), following initiation of a triage protocol.

INTERVENTIONS:

A protocolized, systematic change was done in the practice location.

RESULTS:

Groups were similar for time to first antibiotic administration, sepsis symptom development and positive blood cultures. Length of stay (median 73.5 vs 64.4 h, P=0.0192) and % of neonates with intravenous fluid exposure (50.4% vs 7.6%, P < 0.0001) were lower in the post-intervention group. Exclusive breastfeeding rates improved (pre—7.3% vs post—46.1%, P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Asymptomatic neonates born to mothers with chorioamnionitis were safely treated in a well baby nursery under the guidance of a protocol for triage, thereby reducing NICU exposure for these neonates.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles