Long-term survival after acute kidney injury following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). Severe AKI is associated with high morbidity and mortality in the short term. The objective of this study was to determine the association between AKI after RAAA repair and long-term survival.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients undergoing RAAA repair in three hospitals between 2004 and 2011. Outcomes were long-term survival after RAAA repair, incidence of postoperative AKI, and chronic dialysis rates. Survival rates were compared between different AKI groups (no AKI, Risk, Injury, Failure) with Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and log-rank tests. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were carried out to assess the association of survival with AKI, preoperative shock, postoperative shock, and sex. The main analysis focused on the group of patients surviving initial hospital stay.

Results:

Our study encompassed 362 patients with RAAA. AKI occurred in 267 of 362 patients (74%). At discharge, 267 patients were alive (74%). Median survival in this group was 7.2 years. Survival was not significantly different between the four AKI groups (P = .07). However, the univariable Cox regression analysis demonstrated a significant association between Failure and reduced long-term survival compared with having no AKI (hazard ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–2.97). This association did not remain significant after multivariable adjustment. Four patients were discharged with chronic dialysis, and four other patients needed chronic dialysis later after discharge.

Conclusions:

This study demonstrates no significant independent association between AKI after RAAA repair and long-term survival. Only a small proportion of patients developed end-stage renal disease at a later stage in life.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles