Prevalence, evolution, and related risk factors of kidney disease among Spanish HIV-infected individuals

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Abstract

Prevalence of kidney disease (KD) is increasing among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. Different factors have been related, varying on different published series.

The objectives were to study prevalence of KD in those patients, its evolution, and associated risk factors.

An observational cohort study of 1596 HIV-positive patients with cross-sectional data collection in 2008 and 2010 was conducted. We obtained clinical and laboratory markers, and registered previous or current treatment with tenofovir (TDF) and indinavir (IDV). The sample was divided according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) by modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation. Group 1: eGFR ≤60 mL/min/1.73 m2; group 2: eGFR >60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

Among the patients, 76.4% were men, mean age (SD) 45 ± 9 years, time since diagnose of HIV 14 ± 7 years, and 47.2% of the patients received previous treatment with TDF and 39.1% with IDV. In 2008, eGFR ≤60: 4.9% (91.4% of them in chronic kidney disease [CKD] stage 3, eGFR 59–30 mL/min); this group was older, presented higher fibrinogen levels, and more patients were treated previously with TDF and IDV. In 2010, eGFR ≤60: 3.9% (87.1% stage 3 CKD). The 2.4% of cohort showed renal improvement and 1.3% decline of renal function over time. The absence of hypertension and treatment with TDF were associated with improvement in eGFR. Increased age, elevated fibrinogen, decreased albumin, diabetes mellitus, hyperTG, and worse virological control were risk factors for renal impairment.

The HIV-positive patients in our area have a CKD prevalence of 4% to 5% (90% stage 3 CKD) associated with ageing, inflammation, worse immune control of HIV, TDF treatment, and metabolic syndrome.

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