Near-infrared spectroscopy can detect differences in vascular responsiveness to a hyperglycaemic challenge in individuals with obesity compared to normal-weight individuals

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Abstract

Objective:

To examine whether the near-infrared spectroscopy combined with vascular occlusion test technique could detect differences in vascular responsiveness during hyperglycaemia between normal-weight individuals and individuals with obesity.

Methods:

A total of 16 normal-weight individuals (body mass index, 21.3 ± 1.7 kg/m2) and 13 individuals with obesity (body mass index, 34.4 ± 2.0 kg/m2) were submitted to five vascular occlusion tests (Pre, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after glucose challenge). Vascular responsiveness was determined by the Slope 2 (Slope 2 StO2) and the area under the curve (StO2AUC) of oxygen saturation derived from near-infrared spectroscopy–vascular occlusion test.

Results:

The Slope 2 StO2 increased from 1.07 ± 0.16%/s (Pre) to 1.53 ± 0.21%/s at 90 min (p < 0.05) in the control group, while in obese it increased from 0.71 ± 0.09%/s (Pre) to 0.92 ± 0.14%/s at 60 min (p < 0.05), and to 0.97 ± 0.10%/s (p < 0.01) at 120 min after glucose ingestion. The StO2AUC decreased from 1729 ± 214% . sec (Pre) to 1259 ± 232% . sec at 60 min (p < 0.05) and to 1034 ± 172% . sec at 90 min (p < 0.05) in the normal-weight group, whereas it decreased at 90 min (637 ± 98% . sec; p < 0.05) and at 120 min (590 ± 93% . sec; p < 0.01) compared to 30 min (1232 ± 197% . sec) after glucose ingestion in individuals with obesity.

Conclusion:

Near-infrared spectroscopy–vascular occlusion test technique was capable of detecting differences in vascular responsiveness during hyperglycaemia between normal-weight individuals and individuals with obesity.

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