Effect of Facial Parameters in Primary Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:

In this study, the authors aimed to identify facial and nasal parameters, which may create an anatomic disposition toward obstruction in patients with primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

Materials and Methods:

Forty-eight patients (14 males and 34 females) who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient clinic and were diagnosed with primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction between January 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study. The control group comprised 59 patients (38 females and 21 males) without nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Measurements of nasal height, length, and depth, presence of a nasal hump, alar width and alar angle, distance between the maxillary bone nasal notches, and right and left distances between outer canthi and corners of the mouth were made using photographs of the patients. The presence of facial asymmetry was also assessed.

Results:

Facial asymmetry (P = 0.014) and nasal hump (P = 0.048) were more common in the patient group. The patient group had smaller nasal radix depth (P < 0.001), nasal length (P = 0.001), and alar width (P < 0.001), larger distance between maxillary bone nasal notches (P < 0.001), and smaller alar angle (P < 0.001).

Conclusion:

In the current study, the authors found that primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction occurred more frequently on the side of the face with shorter facial measurements. Smaller nasal radix depth, nasal length, and alar base width, presence of a nasal hump and longer distance between maxillary bone nasal notches may form an anatomic basis for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Based on our results, the authors believe that primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction is associated with facial structure.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles