Dorsal Augmentation of Saddle Nose Deformity With Toothpick-Shaped Costal Cartilage Grafts in the Secondary Septorhinoplasty

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Saddle nose deformity is a challenging complication of septoplasty or septorhinoplasty, characterized by underprojected cartilaginous dorsum. Nasal dorsal augmentation is a significant part of reconstructive surgery of saddle nose deformities. In this study, the authors aimed to discuss the results of using toothpick-shaped costal cartilage grafts in nasal dorsal augmentation of saddle nose deformity. Twelve patients who underwent nasal dorsal augmentation due to moderate to severe saddle nose deformity secondary to the previous septoplasty or septorhinoplasty were retrospectively reviewed. Costal cartilage grafts prepared in the shape of toothpicks were used in all patients. Costal cartilage was used as toothpick-shaped free grafts in 12 patients (female: 7, male: 5) with a mean age of 42 (range: 24–56) for dorsal augmentation in the secondary septorhinoplasty. All patients had a history of previous surgery (septoplasty, n = 9; and septorhinoplasty, n = 3). All patients were operated under general anesthesia with open technique septorhinoplasty. The mean follow-up was 18 (range: 9–48) months. In only 1 of the 12 patients, a postoperative complication was observed including an infection of the tip area in the second postoperative week. None of the patients experienced donor site complications or major graft resorption. All patients were satisfied with functional and esthetic outcomes. No revision surgery was needed in any patient. Toothpick-shaped costal cartilage grafts are useful in nasal dorsal augmentation of moderate to severe saddle nose deformity. This technique offers smooth camouflage, satisfactory accordance with the recipient region, and shorter operation time. In addition, it avoids the side effects from wrapping techniques such as foreign body reaction or additional donor site morbidities.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles