Comparison of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep in guinea pigs and humans

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

SUMMARY

Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity can be a normal variant of oromotor activity, which can be exaggerated in patients with sleep bruxism. However, few studies have tested the possibility in naturally sleeping animals to study the neurophysiological mechanisms of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity. This study aimed to investigate the similarity of cortical, cardiac and electromyographic manifestations of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity occurring during non-rapid eye movement sleep between guinea pigs and human subjects. Polysomnographic recordings were made in 30 freely moving guinea pigs and in eight healthy human subjects. Burst cycle length, duration and activity of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity were compared with those for chewing. The time between R-waves in the electrocardiogram (RR interval) and electroencephalogram power spectrum were calculated to assess time-course changes in cardiac and cortical activities in relation to rhythmic masticatory muscle activity. In animals, in comparison with chewing, rhythmic masticatory muscle activity had a lower burst activity, longer burst duration and longer cycle length (P < 0.05), and greater variabilities were observed (P < 0.05). Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity occurring during non-rapid eye movement sleep [median (interquartile range): 5.2 (2.6–8.9) times per h] was preceded by a transient decrease in RR intervals, and was accompanied by a transient decrease in delta elelctroencephalogram power. In humans, masseter bursts of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity were characterized by a lower activity, longer duration and longer cycle length than those of chewing (P < 0.05). Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep [1.4 (1.18–2.11) times per h] was preceded by a transient decrease in RR intervals and an increase in cortical activity. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity in animals had common physiological components representing transient arousal-related rhythmic jaw motor activation in comparison to human subjects.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles