RESULTS OF RETINAL DETACHMENT SURGERY IN EYES WITH OSTEO-KERATOPROSTHESIS

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Abstract

Purpose:

To evaluate the anatomical and functional results of pars plana vitrectomy in eyes with osteo-keratoprosthesis, who have suffered retinal detachment.

Methods:

An observational, retrospective study of 18 eyes which underwent pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment after an implantation of an osteo-keratoprosthesis, with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. A descriptive study and a Kaplan–Meier survival analysis for anatomical and functional success were performed. Anatomical success was defined as an attached retina at the end of vitreoretinal surgery with no redetachment during the follow-up. Functional success was defined as a postoperative visual acuity of more than or equal to 20/400.

Results:

The overall rate of anatomical success was 56%, and the anatomical survival rates were 67% and 53% at 6 months and 12 months, respectively, maintaining this last value at 24 months after pars plana vitrectomy. The overall rate of functional success was 17%, and the functional survival rates were 83%, 39%, and 14% at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after pars plana vitrectomy, respectively. The most frequent complication after retinal surgery was retroprosthetic membrane (33%).

Conclusion:

Despite the reserved prognosis and the severe complications, vitrectomy represents a valid method for treating retinal detachment in patients with osteo-keratoprosthesis, with good anatomical results but poor visual acuity.

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