Effect of cerebral oxygen saturation on postoperative nausea and vomiting in female laparoscopic surgery patients

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Abstract

Background:

The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of cerebral oxygen saturation (SCTO2) on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in female patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery.

Methods:

This study included 90 female patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery (60 cases of gynecological operations and 30 cases of gallbladder operations). All patients were allocated into 3 groups of 30 patients each: group A (gynecological laparoscopic surgery), group B (gynecological laparoscopic surgery with mannitol treatment) and group C (laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery). Perioperative SCTO2, mean blood flow velocity of vertebral artery (VM), vascular resistance index of vertebral artery (RI), and PONV (within 48 hours after surgery) were investigated.

Results:

No differences in age, body weight, operation time, and hemoglobin levels were observed among the patients (P > .05). The SCTO2 values for groups B and C were lower than those for group A in both brain hemispheres at T4 and T5 (P < .05). The VM was higher in group B than in groups A and C at T3 (P < .05), but differences in VM were not observed between groups B and C at T4 or T5. However, the VM of group A was still lower than the other groups (P < .05), and no difference in VM was observed among the 3 groups at T6 (P > .05). The RI was higher in group C than in groups A and B at T4 (P < .05). The incidence of PONV within 48 hours after surgery was significantly higher in group A than in the other 2 groups (P < .05).

Conclusion:

Strategies that maintain normal SCTO2 may reduce the incidence of PONV in female patients who underwent laparoscopy surgery by reducing perioperative intracranial pressure.

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