Early Behavioral Risks of Childhood and Adolescent Daytime Urinary Incontinence and Nocturnal Enuresis

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Abstract

Objective:

To investigate whether infant temperament and childhood internalizing, externalizing, and inattention symptoms increase the likelihood of daytime urinary incontinence or nocturnal enuresis at 10 years and adolescence (11.9–17.8 years).

Method:

Data were from a longitudinal cohort of 1119 healthy Chilean children. We assessed behavioral symptoms at infancy, 5 years, and 10 years and their relationship with subsequent daytime urinary incontinence and nocturnal enuresis.

Results:

Daytime urinary incontinence and nocturnal enuresis occurred in, respectively, 3.3% and 11.4% at 10 years and 1.1% and 2.7% at adolescence. Difficult infant temperament was associated with increased odds of 10-year daytime urinary incontinence. Inattention at 5 years was associated with increased odds for nocturnal enuresis at 10 years and adolescence. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms at 5 years were associated with increased odds of 10-year daytime urinary incontinence and nocturnal enuresis. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms at 10 years were associated with adolescent nocturnal enuresis.

Conclusion:

Temperament and internal/externalizing symptoms may be risk factors for school-age and adolescent urinary incontinence.

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