Gout Keratitis: A Case of Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis Secondary to Gout With a Review of the Literature

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Abstract

Purpose:

To report a case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis secondary to gout.

Methods:

A 41-year-old man with a history of severe gout disease presented with pain and redness of the right eye. Physical examination revealed 2 areas of peripheral corneal thinning with overlying epithelial defects. Adjacent to these areas, reflective crystals were identified in the corneal stroma. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography demonstrated stromal corneal deposits.

Results:

Systemic workup was negative aside from an elevated serum uric acid level. The patient was administered oral prednisone, allopurinol, and colchicine. At his 2-month follow-up visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his corneal thinning had significantly improved.

Conclusions:

Gout is the most common type of inflammatory arthritis in adults with rising incidence and prevalence. Ocular findings in gout are common, but patients are usually asymptomatic. Monosodium urate crystal deposition has been reported to occur in various parts of the eye, with and without ocular inflammation. Crystal deposition in the cornea is extremely rare and may be a cause of peripheral ulcerative keratitis.

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