Flow diversion for anterior choroidal artery (AChA) aneurysms: a multi-institutional experience

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Abstract

Background

Anterior choroidal artery (AChA) aneurysms represent a small subset of cerebral aneurysms. The Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) has been successfully applied to various aneurysms of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA). The treatment of these aneurysms requires special attention due to the eloquent territory supplied by the AChA. We report the largest and first dedicated series of flow diversion treatment of AChA aneurysms.

Methods

Four institutional neurointerventional databases were reviewed for cases of intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Patient and aneurysm data as well as angiographic imaging were reviewed for all cases of AChA aneurysms treated with PED. AChA aneurysms were defined as aneurysms distal to the AChA and proximal to the ICA terminus, with or without the incorporation of the AChA.

Results

Eighteen AChA aneurysms were treated during the study period. All aneurysms were successfully treated with a mean follow-up of 19.1 months. The large majority of aneurysms (15/18, 83.3%) were completely obliterated. No patients suffered from intra- or post-procedural complications. A1 stenosis was a common occurrence, seen in 10 of 16 (62.5%) covered anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs), although all were asymptomatic. All AChAs remained patent at last follow-up.

Conclusions

The PED can be used successfully in AChA aneurysms with a good safety and efficacy profile. All AChAs remained patent. Collateral flow networks, especially for the ACA, affect long-term branch vessel patency. Treatment with PED for AChA aneurysms appears to be a reasonable option to consider and should be evaluated in a larger cohort.

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