Differential effects of dopaminergic drugs on spontaneous motor activity in the common marmoset following pretreatment with a bilateral brain infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The differential effects of dopaminergic drugs with different pharmacological profiles were investigated with respect to spontaneous motor activity in the common marmoset following pretreatment with a bilateral brain infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Three marmosets received infusions of 6-OHDA (either 30 or 40 μg/side) into the bilateral dopamine-rich area running from the substantia nigra to the striatum. The motor activity of the 6-OHDA marmosets was compared with that of three intact marmosets. Following the administration of apomorphine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, subcutaneously), the 6-OHDA group showed a tendency toward a brief increase in activity counts, suggesting denervation supersensitivity at the dopamine receptors. After the administration of methamphetamine (1 and 2 mg/kg, subcutaneously), the 6-OHDA group showed a significant decrease in activity counts, indicating limited dopamine release from the degenerated neurons. After the administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (10 and 20 mg/kg, orally), the 6-OHDA group showed a significant increase in activity counts without hyperexcitation, consistent with the contribution of exogenous L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine toward dopamine synthesis in the degenerated neurons. The present findings indicate that bilateral brain infusion of 6-OHDA in the marmoset may have preclinical utility as a primate model for investigating the behavioral properties of dopaminergic drugs in brains with dopaminergic neural deficits.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles