Physical Activity Protects Against the Risk of Erosive Esophagitis on the Basis of Body Mass Index

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Abstract

Goal:

To determine whether physical activity lowers the risk for erosive esophagitis on the basis of body mass index (BMI).

Background:

Although previous studies have shown that physical activity is closely associated with erosive esophagitis, these data may be confounded by obesity.

Study:

In this retrospective study, we included 182,409 patients who underwent an upper endoscopy and were diagnosed with erosive esophagitis. The impact of the amount and intensity of physical activity on the risk for erosive esophagitis was analyzed based on BMI groups. Subjects were classified into three BMI groups with equal numbers in each group.

Results:

Overall, 10.3% (n=18,859) of patients were diagnosed with erosive esophagitis. After adjusting for confounding factors, a greater amount of exercise [lower tertile: odd ratio (OR), 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77-0.96; middle tertile: OR, 0.91; 95%, CI 0.84-1.00; upper tertile: OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.73-0.85) and increased exercise intensity (lower tertile, moderate: OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.52-0.71; vigorous: OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.44-0.58; middle tertile, moderate: OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.55-0.70; vigorous: OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.51-0.65; upper tertile, moderate: OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.53-0.65; vigorous: OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.53-0.64) was associated with a decreased risk for erosive esophagitis in all 3 BMI groups. In addition, we observed that increased physical activity intensity notably decreased the risk for erosive esophagitis in subjects performing lesser physical activity, but slightly decreased the risk for erosive esophagitis in subjects performing more physical activity.

Conclusion:

Physical activity is inversely associated with erosive esophagitis.

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