VASCULAR ABNORMALITIES IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY ASSESSED WITH SWEPT-SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY WIDEFIELD IMAGING

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Abstract

Purpose:

To detect vascular abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) widefield images, and to compare the findings with color fundus photographs (CFPs) using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study severity grading.

Methods:

3 mm × 3 mm and 12 mm × 12 mm scans were acquired to cover 70° to 80° of the posterior pole using a 100-kHz SS-OCTA instrument. Two masked graders assessed the presence of vascular abnormalities on SS-OCTA and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study level on CFP. The grading results were then compared.

Results:

A total of 120 diabetic eyes (60 patients) were imaged with the SS-OCTA instrument. Cohort 1 (91 eyes; SS-OCTA grading only) showed microaneurysms in 91% (n = 83), intraretinal microvascular abnormalities in 79% (n = 72), and neovascularization in 21% (n = 19) of cases. Cohort 2 (52 eyes; CFP grading compared with SS-OCTA) showed microaneurysms on CFP in 90% (n = 47) and on SS-OCTA in 96% (n = 50) of cases. Agreement in intraretinal microvascular abnormality detection was fair (k = 0.2). Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography detected 50% of intraretinal microvascular abnormality cases (n = 26), which were missed on CFP. Agreement in detecting neovascularization was moderate (k = 0.5).

Conclusion:

Agreement in detection of diabetic retinopathy features on CFP and SS-OCTA varies depending on the vascular changes examined. Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography shows a higher detection rate of intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (P = 0.039), compared with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading.

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