The longitudinal effects of peritonitis on peritoneal membrane function
.

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The longitudinal effects of peritoneal dialysis (PD) peritonitis on small solute clearance and ultrafiltration are controversial.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We identified 27 patients with PD peritonitis over a 4-year period at a tertiary hospital. Adequacy tests at an "early" (1 - 3 months), "intermediate" (6 ± 2 months), and a "late" (12 ± 2 months) time period after the episode were compared with a pre-peritonitis baseline. The effect of time on serum albumin, weekly creatinine clearance, Kt/V, and net fluid volume removal was assessed.

RESULTS

At 12 months, 16/27 (59.3%) patients were no longer on PD. Ten were transferred to hemodialysis, predominantly due to peritonitis (60%). Five patients died, and 1 received a renal allograft. Total daily fluid volume removal significantly decreased over time with an aggregated mean reduction of 523 mL/day between the baseline and 12-month test (1,624 ± 139 mL vs. 1,101 ± 160 mL; p = 0.02). This was due to an equivalent loss of both ultrafiltration and residual urine output, although the separate decline in these individual parameters was not statistically significant. There was no significant change in Kt/V, creatinine clearance, or serum albumin indicating preserved solute transport in those patients with sustained technique survival post peritonitis.

CONCLUSION

Peritonitis is a common cause for transfer to hemodialysis. Fluid volume removal is the most significantly affected parameter at 12 months post peritonitis, driven by the combination of both ultrafiltration reduction and loss of residual diuresis. Clinicians should be aware that peritonitis identifies patients at high risk for technique failure. These findings should prompt clinicians to closely surveil volume status and consider backup dialytic strategies as early as 12 months post peritonitis.
.

    loading  Loading Related Articles