The administration of surfactant decreased oxidative stress in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke

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Abstract

The alveolar surfactant, which composition consists of a unique and complex mixture of lipids and proteins, has immunomodulatory action. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exogenous surfactant on pulmonary inflammatory response in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). Twenty-four mice C57BL/6 were divided into four groups: control group exposed to ambient air (CG); surfactant treated group (SG); CS exposed group (CSG) and CS exposed group treated with surfactant (CSSG). For five days, CSG and CSSG were exposed to 12 commercial cigarettes/day and SG and CSSG received the surfactant by intranasal instillation. At the end of the experiment, the animals were euthanatized for the collection of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs. The total number of leukocytes in BALF increased in CSG compared to CG, however, there was a decrease in CSSG compared to CSG. There was an increase in lipid peroxidation in SG and CSG compared to CG while there was a decrease in CSSG compared to CSG. Regarding the antioxidant enzymes, the catalase (CAT) activity increased in all groups compared to CG and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased in CSG compared to the CG and SG. There was an increase in TNF in SG, CSG and CSSG compared to CG. There was an increase in IL-17 in CSSG compared to CG. There was an increase in CCL5 in SG and CSSG compared to CG. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the administration of exogenous surfactant was able to decrease the oxidative processes in the lungs of mice induced by short-term exposure to CS.

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