Outcome of Guillain–Barré Syndrome in Tertiary Care Centers in Thailand

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Abstract

Background:

Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), a common acute polyneuropathy, is seen worldwide with significant morbidity and mortality. GBS consists of a number of subtypes.

Objective:

The aim of this study is to identify clinical characteristics, electrophysiologic changes, clinical course, treatment, and outcome of GBS in Thailand.

Material and Methods:

Retrospective study of GBS patients aged 15 years or older, admitted to Thammasat University Hospital and Bangkok Hospital Medical Center between January 1, 2009 and November 30, 2014.

Results:

Thirty patients were found. Demographic characteristics were collected and described as follows; 60% male sex; average age 54 years; Asian 60%, European 20%, and others 10%. Disease subtypes consist of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy 66.7%, acute motor axonal neuropathy 10%, and others 23.3%. Average GBS disability score at admission was 2.9. Immunotherapy was intravenous immunoglobulin 83.3%, plasma exchange 3.3%, and steroid 3.3%. Average length of stay was 14.2 days; assisted ventilation rate was 13.3%. After the average of 1-year follow-up, average GBS disability score was 1.8, good outcome (score <3) was 63.3% and no death.

Conclusions:

Our study suggests that most GBS patients in Thailand are acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) subtype and have a good outcome. Predictors of severe disability are older age, previous diarrhea, autonomic disturbances, severe limb or bulbar weakness at admission, or onset of treatment.

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