Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Training: 2004–2016*

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Abstract

Objectives:

To describe growth trends in the number of programs, positions, and applicants in pediatric critical care medicine fellowship training as part of the Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Training Study.

Design:

Descriptive study.

Settings:

Available archived Match data through the National Resident Matching Program and training data from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

Patients:

None.

Interventions:

None.

Measurements and Main Results:

We analyzed all data on programs, positions, and applicants through the National Resident Matching Program Specialties Matching Service during the study period of 2004 to 2016. We also analyzed available training data available through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for the corresponding study period. During the 12-year study period, there was a statistically significant expansion in programs (38%), positions (82%), and applicants (151%). Correspondingly, the percentage of pediatric critical care medicine programs participating in the Match as a percentage of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited programs for that academic year increased 24%. As of 2015, 94% of total first year positions offered for pediatric critical care medicine were through the Match.

Conclusions:

For the period 2004 to 2016, there was a substantial increase in positions and applicants applying for training in pediatric critical care medicine. We document an increase in demand (i.e., applicants) that has been matched by an increase in supply (i.e., positions) for pediatric critical care medicine fellowship training. The nearly complete use of the National Resident Matching Program for placing applicants in training positions in pediatric critical care medicine suggests that these data can be used to inform workforce analysis in pediatric critical care medicine.

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