The Impact of Prehospital Tranexamic Acid on Blood Coagulation in Trauma Patients

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is limited data on prehospital administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) in civilian trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in coagulation after severe trauma from on-scene to the hospital after TXA application in comparison to a previous study without TXA.

METHODS:

The study protocol was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02354885). A prospective, multicenter, observational study investigating coagulation status in 70 trauma patients receiving TXA (1 g intravenously) on-scene versus a control group of 38 patients previously published without TXA. To account for potential differences in patient and trauma epidemiology, crystalloid and colloidal resuscitation fluid, 2 propensity score matched groups (n = 24 per group) were created. Measurements included ROTEM, standard coagulation tests and blood gas analyses on-scene and emergency department admission. Presented values are mean and [standard deviation], and difference in means and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Patient epidemiology was not different between groups. Coagulation assays on-scene were comparable between the TXA and C. Prehospital hyperfibrinolysis was blunted in all 4 patients in the TXA group. Viscoelastic FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF), representing functional fibrinogen levels, did not change from on-scene to the emergency department in the TXA group, whereas MCF decreased −3.7 [1.8] mm in the control group. Decrease of MCF was significantly reduced in the TXA group in EXTEM by 9.2 (7.2–11.2) mm (P < .001) and INTEM by 6.8 (4.7–9.0) mm (P < .001) in favor of the TXA group. Production of fibrinogen fragments (represented by D-dimers) was significantly lower in the TXA group compared to group C.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early prehospital administration of TXA leads to clot stabilization and a reduction of fibrinolytic activity, causing a decrease in fibrin degradation products buildup (D-dimer).

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