Aspartate transaminase to platelet ratio index and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-to-platelet ratio outweigh fibrosis index based on four factors and red cell distribution width-platelet ratio in diagnosing liver fibrosis and inflammation in chronic hepatitis B.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The benefits of using serum markers to diagnose stages of liver disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are controversial. We conducted a study to compare the clinical significance of four markers in evaluating liver inflammation and fibrosis in CHB patients.

METHODS

A total of 323 treatment-naive CHB patients who received a liver biopsy and routine laboratory testing were enrolled in our study. We used the Scheuer scoring system as a pathological standard for diagnosing liver inflammation and fibrosis. The diagnostic performance of the fibrosis index based on four factors (FIB-4), the aspartate transaminase to platelet ratio index (APRI), the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-to-platelet ratio (GPR), and the red cell distribution width-platelet ratio (RPR) were analyzed with receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC).

RESULTS

No significant differences among the four indexes for diagnosing significant fibrosis (S ≥ 2) was found, while APRI and GPR were superior to FIB-4 and RPR in diagnosing moderate (G ≥ 2), severe (G ≥ 3) inflammation, and severe fibrosis (S ≥ 3). The AUROCs for diagnosing G ≥ 2 and G ≥ 3 were 0.732 and 0.861 for APRI, 0.726 and0.883 for GPR, 0.703 and0.705 for FIB-4, and 0.660 and 0.747 for RPR, respectively. The AUROCs for diagnosing S ≥ 2 and S ≥ 3 were0.724 and 0.799 for APRI, 0.714 and0.801 for GPR, 0.683 and0.730 for FIB-4, and 0.643 and 0.705 for RPR, respectively.

CONCLUSION

APRI and GPR were more effective than FIB-4 and RPR at diagnosing liver inflammation and fibrosis.

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