Perirenal Adiposity is Associated With Lower Progression-Free Survival From Ovarian Cancer

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Abstract

Objectives

Abdominal obesity is linked with a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. However, the link between abdominal obesity and survival after diagnosis of ovarian cancer is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of abdominal obesity on progression-free survival in patients with ovarian cancer.

Methods

Among 258 patients, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volume, along with perirenal adipose tissue thickness (a visceral adiposity proxy measure) was retrospectively measured from abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans obtained within 6 months of ovarian cancer diagnosis. Progression-free survival was computed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to determine relationships between measures of abdominal obesity and clinical variables in relation to progression-free survival.

Results

Patients with perirenal adipose tissue thickness greater than 5 mm(median) had lower rates of progression-free survival at 5 years compared with patients with perirenal adipose tissue thickness less than 5 mm (45.6% vs 53.8%, respectively). Perirenal adipose tissue thickness less than 5 mm was associated with lower rates of progression-free survival on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.82). There was no correlation with other metrics of abdominal adiposity on progression-free survival in univariate or multivariate analysis.

Conclusions

Our data suggest that perirenal adipose, but not body mass index, visceral, or subcutaneous fat volume that were measured within 6 months from diagnosis, is associated with lower rates of progression-free survival in ovarian cancer.

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