Ultra Long-Term Audiometric Outcomes in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma With the Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

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Abstract

Objective:

Define the long-term audiometric outcomes of vestibular schwannomas treated using the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach.

Study Design:

Retrospective records review.

Setting:

University-based tertiary referral center.

Patients:

Patients undergoing treatment of small vestibular schwannomas using the MCF approach.

Intervention(s):

MCF exposure and treatment of small vestibular schwannomas.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Demographic and audiometric variables were assessed.

Results:

Thirteen subjects demonstrated audiometric data for review. The average time between surgery and the most recent audiometric testing was 14 years (range 10–18 yr). The mean baseline pure-tone average (PTA) was 36 dB HL and the most recent PTA was 59 dB HL in the operated ear. The mean baseline PTA was 16 dB HL and the most recent PTA was 37 dB HL in the nonoperated ear. The mean change from baseline to most recent follow-up was a threshold elevation of 22 and 19 dB HL in the operated and nonoperated ears, respectively. The mean baseline speech discrimination score (SDS) was 83% and the most recent SDS was 73% in the operated ear. The mean baseline SDS was 98% and the most recent SDS was 94% in the nonoperated ear. The mean changes from baseline to most recent follow-up were 10 and 0% SDS depression in the operated and nonoperated ears, respectively. The rates of changes in PTA and SDS were not statistically different between the operated and nonoperated ears.

Conclusions:

Surgically preserved hearing is maintained in the majority of patients more than 10 years following surgery. PTA and SDS changes were similar between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears.

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