In vitro and in vivo effects of ophthalmic solutions on silicone hydrogel bandage lens material Senofilcon A.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acuvue Oasys silicone hydrogel contact lenses (Senofilcon A) are used as bandage lenses and often combined with ophthalmic solutions in the treatment of ocular diseases. Concerns have been raised regarding the compatibility and effect of eye-drop solutions on the bandage lenses, which have led to frequent replacement of lenses causing clinical problems. Some patients experience pain or discomfort during treatments and the accumulation of drugs and preservatives in lenses has been suggested as a possible reason. The aim with this study was to investigate the effect of ophthalmic solutions on silicone hydrogel bandage lens material Senofilcon A in vitro and in vivo.

METHODS

The effect of three common ophthalmic solutions Isopto-Maxidex, Timosan and Oftaquix on Acuvue Oasys (Senofilcon A) bandage lenses was evaluated. An in vitro model method was developed where drug and preservative uptake by Acuvue Oasys was monitored with ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry. Surface morphology changes of the lenses were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The method was then implemented for the in vivo pilot study evaluating lenses worn by patients.

RESULTS

In vitro model study monitoring the drug and preservatives uptake showed that the active ingredients from all the eye drops together with preservatives were taken up by the lenses in significant amounts. For the in vivo study no traces of active ingredients or preservatives could be found on the worn and treated lenses regardless of time being worn or dosage profiles. The surface morphology changes in the in vivo study were also minor in contrast to the changes observed in the in vitro scanning electron microscopy images.

CONCLUSION

The in vivo results demonstrate minor effects of the ophthalmic solutions on the worn lenses. These results do not support the building up of preservatives and drugs on the contact lenses as the cause of pain or discomfort experienced by some patients, which is encouraging for the use of bandage lenses in combination with ophthalmic solutions.

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