Association of Cold Ischemia Time With Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

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Abstract

Background

Kidney transplantation holds much promise as a treatment of choice for patients with end-stage kidney disease. The impact of cold ischemia time (CIT) on acute renal transplant rejection (ARTR) remains to be fully studied in a large cohort of renal transplant patients.

Methods

From the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network database, we analyzed 63 798 deceased donor renal transplants performed between 2000 and 2010. We assessed the association between CIT and ARTR. We also evaluated the association between recipient age and ARTR.

Results

Six thousand eight hundred two (11%) patients were clinically diagnosed with ARTR. Longer CIT was associated with an increased risk of ARTR. After multivariable adjustment, compared with recipients with CIT < 12 hours, the relative risk of ARTR was 1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.23) in recipients with CIT ≥ 24 hours. The association of CIT and ARTR was more pronounced in patients undergoing retransplantation: compared with recipients with CIT less than 12 hours, the relative risk of ARTR was 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.73) in recipients with CIT of 24 hours or longer. Additionally, older age was associated with a decreased risk of ARTR. Compared with recipients aged 18 to 29 years, the relative risk of ARTR was 0.50 (95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.57) in recipients 60 years or older. Longer CIT was also associated with increased risk of death-censored graft loss. Compared with recipients with CIT less than 12 hours, the hazard ratio of death-censored graft loss was 1.22 (95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.30) in recipients with CIT of 24 hours or longer.

Conclusions

Prolonged CIT is associated with an increased risk of ARTR and death-censored graft loss. Older age was associated with a lower risk of ARTR.

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