Anxiety Sensitivity and Rumination: Transdiagnostic Factors Involved in the Relation Between Subjective Social Status and Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Disorders Among Economically Disadvantaged Latinos in Primary Care

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Abstract

Latinos face striking physical and mental health disparities. One factor associated with such disparities is subjective social status, reflecting subjective ratings of social standing. Yet there is presently a lack of empirical information about the mechanisms underlying relations between subjective social status and anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders among Latinos in community medical services that serve as focal catchment areas for assessment and intervention programming. The present investigation examined the unique explanatory roles of 2 transdiagnostic factors, rumination and anxiety sensitivity, in the relation between subjective social status and depressive, suicidal, social anxiety, and anxious arousal symptoms as well as anxiety/depressive disorders, among Latinos seeking health services at a primary health care facility. Participants included 253 Latino adults with annual incomes of less than $30,000 (M age = 39.1, SD = 11.1). Results indicated that rumination and anxiety sensitivity each significantly (independently) mediated associations between subjective social status and all dependent variables except suicidal symptoms. For suicidal symptoms, only rumination was a mediator. The present findings suggest that rumination and anxiety sensitivity may represent mechanisms for associations between subjective social status and anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders among economically disadvantaged Latinos in primary care settings.

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