Report on the incidence of squamous cell carcinomas affecting the eyelids in England over a 15-year period (2000–2014)

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Abstract

Aims

The authors report on trends in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) affecting the eyelids in England over a 15-year period and identify associations between demographic factors and SCC risk.

Methods

The National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service identified all cases of eyelid SCC in England between 2000 and 2014. The crude and age-standardised rates of eyelid SCCs in England were calculated. The association of SCC with several known demographic risk factors was then examined to assess their importance in periocular cases.

Results

Over the 15 years studied, there were 4022 patients in England diagnosed with a first episode of SCC affecting the eyelids. The age-standardised number of reported cases rose between 2000 and 2014 by a mean of 0.0137 cases per 100 000 population per year (equivalent to a rise in SCC incidence of approximately 2% per year). The mean age-standardised incidence rate of SCC during the study period was 0.63 cases per 100 000 population per year.

Results

Age was exponentially correlated with incidence, with an approximate doubling of the risk for every decade over the age of 60. The relative risk of eyelid SCC in men compared with women was 1.9. Social deprivation quintile by income was not found to be associated with risk of SCC.

Conclusion

The incidence of eyelid SCC in England is rising. In addition, the age-standardised and population-standardised rate of SCC is also rising. A higher risk of SCC is strongly correlated with age and male sex but not with deprivation.

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