Increased Risks of Developing Anxiety and Depression in Young Patients With Crohn's Disease


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Abstract

OBJECTIVES:Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with substantial psychosocial burden and increased risks for mental health disorders. This retrospective cohort study compared the risks of developing anxiety disorders and depression and incidences of psychotropic medication use between young CD patients and matched CD-free controls.METHODS:Medical claims, prescription drug claims, enrollment, and demographic data for patients <18 years diagnosed with CD were obtained from the MarketScan database (1 January 2000–30 June 2006). Each CD patient was matched with five CD-free controls based on exact age, sex, and months of health plan enrollment. Incidence rates and risks of developing anxiety disorders and depression and psychotropic medication use in the 6 months after the index date were compared, as were risks of developing persistent anxiety or depression (receiving medical services related to a diagnosis of anxiety or depression or psychotropic therapy for >1 year).RESULTS:After adjustment for patient characteristics, the risks of developing anxiety disorders (hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval (CI)]=2.28 [1.65–3.17]) and depression (HR [95% CI]=1.74 [1.35–2.25]) after CD diagnosis were significantly greater for the CD cohort (N=2,144) than for CD-free controls (N=10,720). Patients with CD also had greater risks of developing persistent anxiety and persistent depression (HR [95% CI]=4.35 [2.22–8.50] and 2.75 [1.73–4.38], respectively).CONCLUSIONS:Compared with matched CD-free controls, young patients with CD had significantly greater risks of developing anxiety disorders and depression, were more likely to receive psychotropic treatments, and had significantly greater risks of developing persistent anxiety and depression.

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